walking

Built for walking – Made to walk! Low back pain and exercise

Wondering about low back pain?

Why does it hurt?

Why do so many people in Melbourne have low back pain?

Human beings are designed to move! It may sound simple, but think back to your high school science classes. Apart from making all sorts of misuses of the Bunsen burner, do you remember learning about all those muscles attached to the bones of the human body? They’re everywhere! Unfortunately in the smartphone age, the most commonly used muscle is our adductor pollicis (ie. scrolling up with your thumb). But do you know what the main intended uses of your muscles is for? That’s right, you guessed it: walking! Plain and simple walking.

Now, many of us use our bodies in ways that it is not made to be used (think: sitting at computer nine hours a day then spending the evening scrolling through overwhelming Netflix options). What this does is put abnormal stresses on our body, in particular your lower back, which can result in low back pain. So actually, in most cases of low back pain, there’s not a lot of mystery involved in why it hurts. Backs just simply are not made for the sustained stresses that we put them through.

So if walking is the most basic movement that our bodies are designed for, then it’s no surprise that walking is an excellent remedy for low back pain. Research shows that a simple walking program can be the most effective way of reducing low back pain.

Of course there are limits to abide by, and low back pain is different for everyone, so guidance from your physio in starting a walking program is essential. If you are having trouble, our Physiotherapists  can guide your exercises and address work with you on your low back pain issues.

When it comes to low back pain, most people are looking for a quick fix. Well, this is it! Strap on those Nikes, and take to one of the many lovely tracks Melbourne has to offer.

You won’t regret it!

Daniel Zeunert

Physiotherapist

Daniel is passionate about achieving the best outcomes for his patients by keeping up with the latest evidence-based research in physiotherapy. He uses a combination of exercise and manual therapy, operating under a biopsychosocial approach to patient care.

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